TiS2

Material: TiS2

Basic Info:

General Description [1]: A yellow or gray powder that has an unpleasant odor. It is used as a solid lubricant. TiS2 is very toxic for humans. If it comes in contact with water, hydrogen sulfide is produces, which is a toxic flammable gas. Inhaling the gas can cause severe injury or death.

Fire Hazard. TiS2 is moisture sensitive and is very flammable when it comes into contact with moisture or air.

Thin films of TiS2 are used in Lithium Ion Batteries [2]

Belongs to the transition metal dichalcogenides [3]

TiS2 nanotubes can be used as a hydrogen storage material [3]

 

Crystal Structure:

Lattice Parameters [4]:

a = 3.40 Å

c = 5.69 Å

c/a = 1.67

hexagonalspace group P3m1, 

 

Basic Parameters at 300 K:

 

Band structure and carrier concentration:

Carrier Concentration: 9 x1020 cm-3[4]

A graph showing band structure for TiS2 can be seen at reference [3]

Temperature Dependencies

A graph showing the temperature dependence of resistivity can be seen at reference [3]

 

Electrical Properties:

Room temperature conductivity [5]: 7.6 x10-1 ohm-1 cm-1

A graph of electrical conductivity vs temperature can be seen at reference [4]

 

Basic Parameters of Electrical Properties:

TiS2 is a Semimetallic [3]

Mobility and Hall Effect [5]:

A graph of Hall Mobility vs Temperature can be seen at reference [4]

 

Optical properties:

A graph of the measured reflectivity spectrum of TiS2 vs calculated spectra can be seen at reference [6]

Absorption coefficient vs. phonon energy, etc.

Thermal properties

Lattice parameters with temperature coefficients [7]

 

The development of these pages on photovoltaic materials’ properties was carried out at the University of Utah primarily by undergraduate students Jeff Provost and Carina Hahn working with Prof. Mike Scarpulla. Caitlin Arndt, Christian Robert, Katie Furse, Jash Sayani, and Liz Lund also contributed. The work was fully supported by the US National Science Foundation under the Materials World Network program award 1008302. These pages are a work in progress and we solicit input from knowledgeable parties around the world for more accurate or additional information. Contact earthabundantpv@eng.utah.edu with such suggestions. Neither the University of Utah nor the NSF guarantee the accuracy of these values.